American Investment Training

Tuesday, October 10, 2017

Broker Exams and Licenses NOT requiring Sponsorship - FINRA and NFA Licenses you can get independently


Become a Licensed Investment Professional Independently!
Series 65 - Series 63 - Series 3



The Series 7 and many other exams require a firm to sponsor you before you can sit for the licensing test. This usually means being hired as a full time employee first. After a probationary or training period, a registration can begin by the firm to set the broker trainee or other brokerage employee for an exam.

However, there are many exams that are not included in this restriction. Most of these exams are either advisory in nature (earning fees) or futures market based. The most popular and high valued licenses that do not require a firm to sponsor you include: 

INVESTMENT ADVISORY AND STATE LICENSES

SERIES 65 - Registered Investment Adviser. 

SERIES 63 - Uniformed State Law

SERIES 66 - Combined Series 63/ Series 65

FUTURES AND COMMODITIES LICENSES

SERIES 3 - Futures and Commodities 

SERIES 31 - Futures Managed Funds

SERIES 30 - Futures Branch Manager

SERIES 34 - Retail Forex 


ONLINE COURSES for the Series 63, 65 and 66 are available online to begin right away with 24/7 access:   https://blaze.firesolutions.com/portal/form/3155

Courses for the Series 3 and all futures exams can be ordered through our self study education site:

https://squareup.com/store/h-internet-international

Friday, July 14, 2017

Finra Licenses - Series 7, Series 65 and more. License Summaries - Test Questions and Series online course info

American Investment Training provides full online course training for the:

SERIES 6

SERIES 7

SERIES 9

SERIES 10

SERIES 24

SERIES 63

SERIES 65

SERIES 66

All courses include a full PASS Guarantee. If you complete the course and fail the real exam - we refund you 100%!   That is why our pass ratio is near 100%

Summary of Series Exams and Courses:

SERIES 6

The Series 6 exam - the Investment Company and Variable Contracts Products Representative Qualification Examination (IR) - evaluates an entry-level representative's proficiency to perform duties as an investment company and variable contracts products representative. This exam comprises 100 scored questions with an additional 5 unscored "pretest" questions. Applicants have two-hours and 15-minutes to complete the exam. The passing score is 70%.

SERIES 7

The Series 7 exam - the General Securities Representative Qualification Examination (GS) - evaluates an entry-level registered representative's proficiency to perform duties as a general securities representative. This exam comprises 250 scored questions with an additional 10 unscored "pretest" questions. Applicants have six-hours to complete the exam - conducted in two three-hour sessions comprising 130 questions per session. The passing score is 72%. The Series 66 or 63 and 65 exam(s) typically follow this exam.

SERIES 9

The Series 9 exam — the General Securities Sales Supervisor Qualification Examination — evaluates a registered representative's proficiency and knowledge of securities industry rules and particular statutory provisions applicable to supervising sales activities of options at a branch office. 

This exam comprises 55 scored questions with an additional five unscored "pretest" questions. Applicants have one-hour and 30-minutes to complete the exam. The passing score is 70%. 

SERIES 10

This exam comprises 145-scored questions with an additional 10-unscored "pretest" questions. Eligible representatives have 4-hours to complete the exam with a passing score of 70%. The Series 7 (or foreign equivalent) is a prerequisite for this examination. The Series 7 licensed representative must be associated with and sponsored by a FINRA member firm for eligibility to take the Series 10 or 9 exams. Along with the Series 9, the Series 10 exam is required to qualify for the Series 8 branch manager license. Either exam may be taken first, sequence does not matter

SERIES 24

The exam measures the degree to which each candidate possesses the knowledge needed to perform the critical functions of a general securities principal, including the rules and statutory provisions applicable to the supervisory management of a general securities broker-dealer. The Series 24 consists of 150 scored questions and an additional 10 unscored pretest questions. Candidates are given three hours and 45 minutes to complete the exam. The passing score is 70 percent.

SERIES 63

The Series 63 exam - the Uniform Securities Agent State Law - developed by NASAA and administered for NASAA by FINRA, evaluates an entry-level registered representative's proficiency in understanding the principles of state securities regulations reflected in the Uniform Securities Act with NASAA rule amendments prohibiting dishonest and unethical business practices. The exam provides state securities administrators a basis to evaluate an applicant's knowledge and understanding of state law and regulations. This exam is comprised of 60 scored questions and 5 unscored "pretest" questions. Applicants have one-hour and 15-minutes to complete the exam. The passing score is 72%. The Series 63 does not have any prerequisites and can be taken without being sponsored by a FINRA member firm. However, to transact securities business, an individual must also take and pass the Series 6 or Series 7 and be associated with and sponsored by a FINRA member firm.

SERIES 65

The Series 65 exam - the Uniform Investment Adviser Law - developed by NASAA and administered for NASAA by FINRA, evaluates an entry-level proficiency to provide investment advice to clients and in understanding the principles of state securities regulations reflected in the Uniform Securities Act with NASAA rule amendments prohibiting dishonest and unethical business practices. The exam provides state securities administrators with a basis to evaluate an applicant's knowledge and understanding of state law and regulations. This exam comprises 130 scored questions and 10 unscored "pretest" questions. Applicants have three-hours to complete the exam. The passing score is 72%.

SERIES 66

The Series 66 exam - the Uniform Combined State Law - developed by NASAA and administered for NASAA by FINRA, evaluates entry-level proficiency to provide investment advice and effect securities transactions for clients, as well as understanding the principles of state securities regulations reflected in the Uniform Securities Act with NASAA rule amendments prohibiting dishonest and unethical business practices. The exam provides state securities administrators with a basis to evaluate an applicant's knowledge and understanding of state law and regulations. This exam comprises 100 scored questions and 10 unscored "pretest" questions. Applicants have two-hours and 30-minutes to complete the exam. The passing score is 73%. The Series 7 is a co-requisite for this examination but either exam can be taken first and the Series 66 does not require FINRA member firm sponsorship. The Series 7 licensed representative, however, must be associated with and sponsored by a FINRA member firm.

ONLINE COURSES ARE AVAILABLE THROUGH OUR MAIN COURSE PORTAL HERE




Monday, January 2, 2017

Understand Bond Yields for the Series 7 - Nominal, Current and Yield to Maturity

Most bonds are fixed income securities. They pay a stated rate of interest to par. That fixed rate is the nominal yield. The nominal yield does not change during the life of the bond. It is also known as the coupon rate. 

Bond Pricing vs. Yield

If a bond is purchased at a discount, par or at a premium, the nominal rate stays the same and the actual interest payments received are not changed as well. 

Nominal Yield Example

If a person buys a corporate bond at a price of $98.50 and the nominal rate is 3%, the investor is actually paying 985.00 per $1000 bond. They will be paid 3% on the par value $1000 per year, but since only 985.00 was invested and they are getting $1000 back at maturity (all bonds mature at par), their YTM will be higher than 3%. If a bond is held to the end, the yield to maturity is it's true rate of return - not the nominal yield.

Current interest rates will dictate where the nominal rate is set. There are also other factors that will determine it. These include:
  • Maturity length and where the yield curve is
  • Bond Rating - an issuer with a lower credit rating will have to offer a higher nominal yield or issue the bond as an OID - Original issue discount
  • Interest Payment Frequency
  • Type of bond - Municipal, Corporate or other
  • Callable or non callable

Current Yield

A bond's current yield is not as important to an investor. It is not the actual interest rate received and it is not the overall yield to maturity. 

A bond's current yield can be found by dividing the coupon or nominal by the current market price of the security. It is not an overly important yield to investors - as it is always changing and is most important if someone is pricing the bond to sell. If an investor is holding the security to maturity - then the current yield is not a big concern.

A debt that is priced above par (premium) will have a lower current yield vs. the nominal. A 7% corporate debenture priced at $102 will have a current of 6.86% ($70 divided by $1020). Discounted bonds will have a higher current yield than it's coupon rate.

Yield To Maturity

To most investors, the yield to maturity is the most accurate and best measure of a bondholder's overall rate of return. 

YTM uses all the components of a bond investment to come up with a true overall yield on the security. The formula and calculation is based on the bond reaching maturity. As with most bonds, default is rare, so the real risk lies with the following:
  • Is the bond callable?
  • What price is it callable at?
  • When are the call dates?
  • Interest rates rise and bond is sold (result in loss in most cases)
  • How long is the maturity? - A bond with a Yield of 4% for 2 years is usually better than a length of 10 years in a normal or upsloping yield curve.

GET YOUR SERIES 7 LICENSE HERE ONLINE - 100% PASS GUARANTEE!